Eighth Season of Healthy Minds with Dr. Jeffrey Borenstein Debuts Nationally During Mental Health Awareness Month in May

Posted: April 25, 2023
 

Candid Conversations and Expert Commentary on Childhood Anxiety, Suicide Prevention, Bipolar Disorder, Eating Disorders and Other Mental Health Issues

NEW YORK (April 26, 2023) – The eighth season of the Emmy® nominated public television series Healthy Minds with Dr. Jeffrey Borenstein debuts nationally in May during Mental Health Awareness Month, featuring inspiring personal stories and experts sharing the latest information on new approaches to the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of mental illness.

“Today there is increased openness to discussing mental health, however stigma and misunderstanding remain prevalent and still often keep people from seeking help for themselves or their loved ones,” says Jeffrey Borenstein, M.D., President and CEO of the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation. Dr. Borenstein, who developed the series and serves as its host and executive producer, adds, “Healthy Minds inspires conversations about mental illness, provides understandable information and resources for viewers, and demonstrates that with help, there is hope.”

In the latest season, which includes 13 new half-hour episodes, Dr. Borenstein has conversations with leading experts offering insightful information about a wide variety of topics in mental health and in some cases sharing their own stories of living with mental illness.

Healthy Minds takes a close look at childhood anxiety and depression, eating disorders, borderline personality disorder and bipolar disorder in several episodes, with specific guidance for parents and important tools to help families recognize the signs and symptoms of mental disorders in adolescents and young adults.

For older viewers, there is an episode explaining how wisdom can be a major factor in healthy aging and how to improve brain function through social connections, self-reflection, and humor.

Nii Addy, Ph.D., Albert E. Kent Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Associate Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, and the inaugural Director of Scientist Diversity and Inclusion at Yale School of Medicine, discusses a holistic approach to chemical dependency that considers the role of social and economic factors on mental health. 

Informative episodes highlight the work of major organizations offering resources for mental health patients and their families: Headstrong Project, a confidential resource for active military and veterans. Clubhouse International, a social support membership organization designed to give people living with mental illness what they need beyond medication and therapy, including education, training, housing, and a safe space to find community. The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), the largest grassroots mental health organization in the United States.

Dawn Velligan, Ph.D. of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio discusses the latest research on schizophrenia. Christine Yu Moutier, M.D., Chief Medical Officer of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention offers insights on suicide. Kay Redfield Jamison, Ph.D., offers a unique perspective on bipolar disorder, as both a leading researcher and author on the subject and a patient herself.

Season 8 is available nationally on PBS.org starting May 1. Viewers can also see if it is airing in their area by looking up Healthy Minds with Dr. Jeffrey Borenstein on their local PBS station or visiting: https://www.bbrfoundation.org/healthy-minds-tv

Healthy Minds is produced by the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation, the nation’s largest private funder of mental health research grants. The show is presented by Connecticut Public Television (CPTV) and distributed by the National Education Telecommunications Association (NETA). Funding is provided by the American Psychiatric Association Foundation and the John & Polly Sparks Foundation.

Episode Details

Chemical Dependency: A Holistic Approach to Treatment
Research into the commonality of brain patterns of chemical dependency and depression and aspects of relapse seen in the brain, as well as a focus on the social and economic factors of mental health, can help families treat and prevent addiction. Guest: Nii Addy, Ph.D., Albert E. Kent Associate Professor of Psychiatry, and Associate Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, and the inaugural Director of Scientist Diversity and Inclusion at Yale School of Medicine.

Help for Veterans and Military Families: The Headstrong Project
A confidential mental health resource for active military and veterans treats the invisible wounds of war, lowers barriers to care, and serves the entire family facing a wide range of mental health issues including PTSD, chemical dependency, and suicide prevention. Guest: Headstrong Project CEO James D. McDonough, Jr. (COL U.S. Army Retired).

Schizophrenia: Understanding Diagnosis and Treatment
An overview to help understand the role of family history, negative symptoms, behavioral analysis, and prescription compliance for successful outcomes for treatment. Guest: Dawn Velligan, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

Suicide Prevention, Part One: What You and Your Family Need to Know
The latest research looking at the rise in rates among different cultural groups, effective prevention strategies, the myths and importance of communication with suicidal individuals, and more. Guest: Dr. Christine Yu Moutier, Chief Medical Officer of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and a leader in the field.

 

Suicide Prevention, Part Two: What You and Your Family Need to Know
The complicated grief of suicide loss, the importance of identifying risk factors and strategies for intervention as well as postvention, when suicide contagion is a concern, and more. Guest: Dr. Christine Yu Moutier, Chief Medical Officer of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and a leader in the field.

Wisdom and Healthy Aging
Self-reflection, social connections, humor, and more factors that can improve neuroplasticity, as studies show the impact of mental health on aging. Guest: Dilip V. Jeste, M.D., former Senior Associate Dean for Healthy Aging and Senior Care, Professor of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego, and author of Wiser: The Scientific Roots of Wisdom, Compassion and What Makes Us Good.

Childhood Anxiety and Depression: What Every Parent Needs to Know
Recognizing anxiety or depression in children as young as preschool age, how to distinguish between a behavioral phase and a clinical concern, and knowing when to seek medical evaluation and treatment can be more difficult than with adults or even teens. Guest: Joan L. Luby, M.D., Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig, Professor of Psychiatry (Child), Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Eating Disorders: Diagnosis and Treatment
Anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating, and avoidant restrictive food disorder (ARFID) have physical as well as psychological impact, with the most severe consequences of organ failure and death. The latest research shows a genetic component to these defenses against underlying anxiety. Guest: Cynthia M. Bulik, Distinguished Professor of Eating Disorders, Founding Director of the University of North Carolina Center of Excellence for Eating Disorders. 

Borderline Personality Disorder
Growing awareness of this mental illness characterized by heightened emotional response and volatile relationships, often starting as a teen or young adult, has led to more research in identifying the role of environment and risk factors, and new therapies to manage and treat patients with the involvement of their families. Guest: Edward A. Selby, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Director of Clinical Training, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.

Bipolar Disorder, Part One: A Conversation with Kay Redfield Jamison, Ph.D.
The psychologist and MacArthur Fellow shares her experience as both a researcher and someone living with bipolar disorder, exploring the latest information about diagnosis and treatment for this mental illness that often strikes young adults during an already vulnerable time of life.

Bipolar Disorder, Part Two: A Conversation with Kay Redfield Jamison, Ph.D.
The psychologist and MacArthur Fellow shares her experience living with bipolar disorder, and explains factors of heredity, the necessity of early diagnosis and ongoing treatment, and the role of parents in helping young adults manage their risk during the most common onset period of the disorder. Dr. Jamison’s many books on the subject include Fires in the Dark: Healing the Unquiet Mind.

NAMI: National Alliance on Mental Illness
The non-profit organization founded in 1979 by family members of people diagnosed with mental illness has grown into the largest grass roots mental health organization in the United States dedicated to building better lives for mental health patients with free resources, support, and events. Guest: NAMI CEO Daniel H. Gillison, Jr.

Creating Community and Giving Hope: Clubhouse International
A social support membership organization designed to give people living with mental illness what they need beyond medication and therapy – help with securing jobs, education, housing, a safe space to find community, and more, where they can also give back to help others. Guest: Clubhouse International Executive Director and CEO Joel D. Corcoran.

About Brain & Behavior Research Foundation
The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation awards research grants to develop improved treatments, cures, and methods of prevention for mental illness. These illnesses include addiction, ADHD, anxiety, autism, bipolar disorder, borderline personality disorder, depression, eating disorders, OCD, PTSD, and schizophrenia, as well as research on suicide prevention. Since 1987, the Foundation has awarded more than $440 million to fund more than 5,300 leading scientists around the world. 100% of every dollar donated for research is invested in research. BBRF operating expenses are covered by separate foundation grants.

About Connecticut Public Broadcasting Network
The Connecticut Public Broadcasting Network (CPBN) is home to CPTV, WNPR, and the Learning Lab. CPTV is a locally and nationally recognized producer and presenter of quality public television programming, including original documentaries, public affairs, and educational programming. WNPR is an affiliate of National Public Radio, Public Radio International, and American Public Media. The Learning Lab serves high school seniors through a partnership with Hartford Public Schools and the Journalism and Media Academy Magnet School. It is also home to the Institute for Advanced Media, a program that provides the men and women of our armed forces and adult learners an opportunity to learn skills necessary for the 21st century digital media workplace.  

About the National Educational Telecommunications Association
The National Educational Telecommunications Association is a professional association that serves public television licensees and educational entities in all 50 states, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico. Since 1967, the Association’s reason for existing has been to connect public television people and ideas, by providing quality programming, educational resources, professional development, management support, and national representation. 

Source:
Brain & Behavior Research Foundation

Contact:
Myrna Manners, Manners Dotson Group,
718-986-7255, mmanners@mannersdotson.com