Did you know major depressive disorder is one of the most common mental disorders in the United States?

Almost 7% of the U.S. population is diagnosed with depression. Tweet >

Clinical depression is a serious condition that negatively affects how a person thinks, feels, and behaves. In contrast to normal sadness, clinical depression is persistent, and significantly interferes with daily life. Untreated, symptoms can last for weeks, months, or years; and if inadequately treated, depression can lead to other health-related issues. Symptoms include: a depressed mood most of the day, every day; diminished interest in daily activities; changes in appetite and sleeping patterns; fatigue; restlessness; anxiety; feelings of worthlessness or helplessness; difficulty concentrating; increased alcohol or drug use; thoughts of death or suicide.

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Patrick F. Sullivan, M.D., FRANZCP - Brain & behavior research expert on depression
Patrick Sullivan, M.D.
September 15, 2015
From The Quarterly, Summer 2015 Researchers have identified more than 100 genes whose activity differs significantly between people with major depressive...
Fernando Sampaio Goes, M.D. - Brain & behavior research expert on depression
Dr. Fernando S. Goes
September 01, 2015
A new study has pinpointed rare genetic variations that are found more commonly in people with early-onset depression than in people unaffected by the disorder...
James A. Bibb, Ph.D. - Brain & behavior research expert on depression & anxiety
James A. Bibb, Ph.D.
August 21, 2015
Researchers have found that by specifically targeting a central signaling pathway in the brain, they can improve the innate behavioral response to stress in...
Kenneth Kendler, M.D. - Brain & Behavior research expert on depression
Kenneth Kendler, M.D.
August 10, 2015
Genetic studies have recently yielded large numbers of "hits" for genes that subtly increase or decrease risk for disorders, including for schizophrenia....
Andrew M. McIntosh, Ph.D. - Brain & Behavior Research expert on depression
Andrew M. McIntosh, Ph.D.
August 07, 2015
New research has found that being depressed increases the impact of having a genetic predisposition for obesity. A team based at the University of Edinburgh...


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