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Myrna Weissman, Ph.D. - Brain & behavior research expert on depression
January 29, 2016

The evidence is quite strong that if you can keep yourself in remission, which may require continual available treatment, your children are less affected; again, this is the case when we look at populations as a whole. On an individual level you might explain that you understand that he/she sees you looking sad but you are taking care of this problem. You might say, “it’s a grownup problem called depression and Mommy is getting help for it.” If you are still concerned, consider having a consultation with a clinical expert who specializes in working with children. A therapist can talk with you about the things that worry you and suggest ways you can engage your child in a discussion.

Myrna Weissman, Ph.D.
Scientific Council Member
Columbia University & New York State Psychiatric Institute

TAGS: Depression
Myrna Weissman, Ph.D. - Brain & behavior research expert on depression
Q There is a history of depression in my family. But how do I know whether my teenage daughter is just moody (like lot of girls her age) or whether she’s actually depressed?
A Here we need to differentiate between population science and individual... More >
Myrna Weissman, Ph.D. - Brain & behavior research expert on depression
Q Why does the incidence of depression go up after puberty? Is it because of hormones?
A There are good population-based data showing that the onset of depression... More >