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Did you know that schizophrenia affects more than 1 percent of the world's population?

See NARSAD Grants at work on the latest schizophrenia research

Schizophrenia is a severe, chronic, and generally disabling brain and behavior disorder. It is most accurately described as a psychosis - a type of illness that causes severe mental disturbances that disrupt normal thoughts, speech, and behavior. Schizophrenia is believed to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

Positive symptoms may include delusions, thought disorders, and hallucinations. People with schizophrenia may hear voices other people don't hear, or believe other people are reading their minds, controlling their thoughts, or plotting to harm them. Negative symptoms may include avolition (a lack of desire or motivation to accomplish goals), lack of desire to form social relationships, and blunted affect and emotion. Cognitive symptoms involve problems with attention and memory, especially in planning and organization to achieve a goal. Cognitive deficits are the most disabling for patients trying to lead a normal life.

learn more about schizophrenia

Visit the Schizophrenia Research Forum, fully sponsored by the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation—a virtual community of scientists collaborating in their quest for causes, improved treatments, and better understanding of schizophrenia.

Visit the Schizophrenia Research Forum for more information about research

 

Mike Wallace and Mary Yates Wallace
Mike and Mary Wallace
September 13, 2012
Supporter of mental health awareness, philanthropist, former Brain & Behavior Research Foundation Board Member and passionate mental health supporter, Mary...
Karl Deisseroth, M.D., Ph.D., of Stanford University, expert on Optogenetics and Depression
Dr. Karl Deisseroth
September 06, 2012
Karl Deisseroth, M.D., Ph.D., of Stanford University used his NARSAD Young Investigator Grant to help invent optogenetics. On September 7th, he and three other...
Jack Nitschke, Ph.D., a neuroscientist, clinical psychologist, and associate professor of psychiatry and psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison
Jack Nitschke, Ph.D.
September 04, 2012
A new study published online reveals that people with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) have weaker connections in the brain that effect the amygdala, a pair...
Paul H. Patterson, Ph.D., Professor of Biological Sciences at the Division of Biology at the California Institute of Technology, expert on Brain-Immune Connections in Autism, Schizophrenia, and Depression
Paul H. Patterson, Ph.D.
August 27, 2012
An article published August 25th in The New York Times reports that at least one-third of autism cases may be due to inflammatory disease that begins in the...
August 24, 2012
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Brain & Behavior Research Foundation Hosts 2012 Women’s Mental Health Conference on September 14th (GREAT NECK, N.Y. – August 23,...

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