Schizophrenia

Did you know that schizophrenia affects more than 1 percent of the world's population?

See NARSAD Grants at work on the latest schizophrenia research

Schizophrenia is a severe, chronic, and generally disabling brain and behavior disorder. It is most accurately described as a psychosis - a type of illness that causes severe mental disturbances that disrupt normal thoughts, speech, and behavior. Schizophrenia is believed to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

Positive symptoms may include delusions, thought disorders, and hallucinations. People with schizophrenia may hear voices other people don't hear, or believe other people are reading their minds, controlling their thoughts, or plotting to harm them. Negative symptoms may include avolition (a lack of desire or motivation to accomplish goals), lack of desire to form social relationships, and blunted affect and emotion. Cognitive symptoms involve problems with attention and memory, especially in planning and organization to achieve a goal. Cognitive deficits are the most disabling for patients trying to lead a normal life.

learn more about schizophrenia

Visit the Schizophrenia Research Forum, fully sponsored by the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation—a virtual community of scientists collaborating in their quest for causes, improved treatments, and better understanding of schizophrenia.

Visit the Schizophrenia Research Forum for more information about research

 

Joseph T. Coyle, M.D., of Harvard-affiliated McClean Hospital, a schizophrenia expert
Joseph T. Coyle, M.D.,
June 27, 2013
Some scientists suspect that the debilitating symptoms of schizophrenia  emerge from problems with a brain chemical called glutamate. Although glutamate drives...
David J. Porteous, Ph.D., of the University of Edinburgh, U.K., Expert on schizophrenia
David J. Porteous, Ph.D.
June 24, 2013
Many genes have come to the attention of mental illness researchers because tiny variations in them appear to increase the risk of mental illness. But one gene...
John A. Gray, M.D., Ph.D., of University of California, San Francisco, Expert on Schizophrenia
John A. Gray, M.D., Ph.D.
June 20, 2013
Though the underlying causes of schizophrenia are poorly understood, there is a growing body of research implicating abnormalities in the function of NMDARs (N...
Karl Deisseroth, M.D., Ph.D., Stanford University, brain research expert and inventor of optogenetics
Karl Deisseroth, M.D., Ph.D.
June 14, 2013
  Rewards can be powerful teachers, but it is actually the surprising moments—when an anticipated reward does not come, or when one arrives unexpectedly—that...
Melissa R. Warden, Ph.D., of Stanford University, expert on schizophrenia
Melissa R. Warden, Ph.D.
June 10, 2013
A team of neuroscientists, including NARSAD Young Investigator Grantee Melissa R. Warden, Ph.D., of Stanford University, devised new analytical methods to...

Pages

Subscribe to