Depression Researchers Make Headway in Search for Predictors of Relapse Risk

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Scientific Council Member, John  H.  Krystal, MD
John H. Krystal, MD.

A new paper published in Biological Psychiatry suggests that depressed patients who ruminate and activate the brain's frontal lobes are more likely to relapse into depression than those who respond with acceptance and activate visual areas in the back of the brain.

Using magnetic resonance imaging, researchers studied patients’ brains and responses while exposed to sad movie clips, and followed their recovery process. The findings may indicate a new marker for the prediction of relapse. John H. Krystal, M.D., Scientific Council Member and editor of Biological Psychiatry, said "Relapse is one of the most vexing problems in depression treatment. Having a biomarker for relapse could guide a new generation of treatment research."

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