The NARSAD Feed: NARSAD Researchers in the News, Research Finds Bipolar Disorder is Under-Diagnosed in Some Countries, Talk Therapy Doesn’t Pay

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Presidents Nixon, Clinton & Obama (from left to right)
Presidents Nixon, Clinton & Obama (from left to right)

New York Times Interviews NARSAD Young Investigator About Brain Asymmetry Research that Connects Brain Activity to Behaviors
NARSAD Young Investigator Daniel Geschwind, M.D., Ph.D., studies the connections between language and handedness, or hand dominance, and the ways that handedness can help us understand the evolution of the human brain. With a NARSAD Young Investigator Grant, Dr. Geschwind examined brain asymmetries as they related to schizophrenia.

NARSAD Investigators Find Depression Can Continue in Women Years After a Miscarriage
NARSAD Young Investigator Emma Robertson Blackmore, Ph.D., and Independent Investigator Thomas G. O’Connor, Ph.D., and colleagues at the University of Rochester Medical Center found that depression and anxiety experienced by many women after a miscarriage can continue for years, even after the birth of a healthy child. This finding could lead to better diagnostic techniques and treatment for the affected women and their children. Researchers studied more than 13,000 pregnant women who were part of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children in the United Kingdom.

Bipolar Disorder Under-Diagnosed in Some Countries, Severity Similar
New research suggests the severity of bipolar disorder is similar in both affluent nations and low-income countries. But its prevalence, or the proportion of people diagnosed with bipolar disorder, varies by country and treatment needs often go unmet.

Cancer Survivors Boast, So Should Mental Illness Champs
While society often fears or mocks people with mental illnesses, many people today manage their mental illnesses in the same ways that people live with diabetes, says Tica King, 59, a peer counselor at the Kenneth Young Center in Elk Grove Village. Once debilitated by her mental illness, King recovered more than 25 years ago.

Talk Doesn’t Pay, So Psychiatry Turns Instead to Drug Therapy
Medicine is rapidly changing in the United States from a cottage industry to one dominated by large hospital groups and corporations, but the new efficiencies can be accompanied by a telling loss of intimacy between doctors and patients. And no specialty has suffered this loss more profoundly than psychiatry.

by Barbara Wheeler, NARSAD manager of communications and media relations

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Please note that researchers cannot give specific recommendations or advice about treatment; diagnosis and treatment are complex and highly individualized processes that require comprehensive face-to- face assessment. Please visit our "Ask an Expert" section to see a list of Q & A with NARSAD Grantees.
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